Lubańska Kamienna Góra is an extinct volcano. During World War II, the Germans dug drifts in its basalt rock. They stretch hundreds of meters below the mountain. 

 

Lubań witnessed fierce fights between Germans and the Red Army. In March 1945, the troops of the Third Reich achieved their last military victory. The Germans not only captured Lubań but caused the Russians to have heavy losses.

 

As the end of the war approached, the Germans took great pains to ensure that no one learned their secrets. In a very professional manner, they blew up the entrances to these drifts over a distance of more than 50 meters. This has proven to be very effective. Even in the 1950s, it was impossible to get into them.

 

Currently, a group of history enthusiasts has overcome the entirety of these heaps. They are 3-4 meters from the entrance to the centre.

 

No one had been there before, since the entrances to those drifts were blown up. We don't know at this point what might be in there. Certainly, there is no "gold train" whatsoever. But we do know one thing. The Germans took great pains not only to forge passages in the hardest rock, which is basalt. They also did this to blow up all the entrances to the underground in May 1945 - after the fall of Berlin and Breslau, before the Russians entered. This was the last task after which they withdrew to the American zone and laid down their arms there," we read the information provided by the Association of Upper Lusatia Lovers from Lubań.

 

The plans for the drift were destroyed, but the Germans made one mistake. In the 90s, in the archives of the town of Lubań, in completely different documents, a piece of tracing paper with plans of these undergrounds was accidentally found.

 

“At this point, we're guessing there might be something hidden in there. This is the thesis, since until the very last moment - before the Germans withdrew from Lubań - they tried to blow up all entrances meticulously. If there was nothing in these drifts, there would have been no need to blow up these entrances, just before the Russians re-entered Lubań. Especially since the capitulation of Germany was announced in a few days," - the association members add.

 

The entire campaign is funded by voluntary contributions, which can still be made online. It is supervised by the authorities of Lubań, the provincial conservator of monuments, and the army. Sappers are checking to make sure the place is safe. For there is a strong possibility that the corridors are mined.