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    Tusk Claims He Formed Alliance to Support Ukraine Post-Crimea, But…

    ‘I remember my first experiences when I was prime minister; it was the beginning of the first Russian aggression in Ukraine – in Crimea and Donbas. I recall how difficult it was for me – individually mobilizing other leaders in Europe to actively support Ukraine,’ he stated after meeting with Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen. Let us recall how the then-prime minister spoke about the criminal regime, barely four months after the peninsula’s annexation.

    Today, Donald Tusk met with Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen. After their discussion, they made a statement to the media, emphasizing that Ukraine needs Western support to win the war against Russia. A question arose from the audience about what he expects from other European leaders, given that not all countries are as enthusiastic about supporting the battling nation. He began his response by recounting how he fought for the good of Ukraine when it was attacked by Russia in 2014.

    ‘I think we are in a better situation today than two or four years ago. I remember my first experiences when I was prime minister, it was the beginning of the first Russian aggression in Ukraine – in Crimea and Donbas. I remember how difficult it was for me to individually mobilize other leaders in Europe to actively support Ukraine,’ he said.

    According to him, the situation is now better. ‘In Berlin, Paris, other capitals, something extraordinary is happening. We see solidarity, readiness to support Ukraine. There is always room for improvement. There is no doubt about that,’ he stated. He defended the approach of the government in Berlin and reminded that Germany had recently announced the decision to send another batch of Patriot missile launchers to Ukraine.

    Tusk after the annexation of Crimea on the ‘anti-Russian fuss’

    The annexation of Crimea by Russia occurred in March 2014. Less than four months later, the fate of the government led by Donald Tusk was being debated in the Polish Sejm. The deputies discussed a vote of no confidence for his Council of Ministers. Tusk indeed mentioned Russia’s actions, but not in the way he tries to present it today.

    ‘If there is a certain problem that we must solve every day, permanently in relations with all – without exception – European partners, it is the problem of eliminating or reducing this false image that Poland is a Russophobic country with Russophobic authorities and whoever governs Poland, Poland will always organize Europe into some kind of anti-Russian fuss,’ he said in 2014.”

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