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    What about Frontex? Saryusz-Wolski: It is unable to give us any help

    “Poland does not need Frontex’s help, and it is not in a position to provide any help. The best form of support from the European Union would be political and diplomatic support, and avoiding sanctions against Poland”, believes Law and Justice MEP Jacek Saryusz-Wolski. In an interview with Michał Rachoń, the politician also admitted that the European Union has a “schizophrenic policy” when it comes to defending its borders.

    “The discussion about Frontex shows that few people who call Frontex know what it is. This is an office with 1,300 officials, inefficient, with no resources of its own to guard the border. Secondly, under EU law it can only act if invited by the country concerned. According to the principle of subsidiarity and subsidiarity, Article 5 of the Treaty on European Union, action should be taken at the lowest possible level and only at a higher level when necessary. This is the case. Moreover, both migration and border surveillance are the exclusive competence of the Member States,” underlined Jacek Saryusz-Wolski.

     

    “In short, Poland does not need help, and Frontex is not in a position to provide any help. The best form of support from the European Union would be political and diplomatic support and, above all, avoiding stabbing Poland in the back with attacks and sanctions,” the Law and Justice MEP concluded.

     

    Saryusz-Wolski reminded that blocking the flow of migrants to Germany is in the interest of this country, hence the various proposals, including financing the construction of a wall on the Polish-Belarusian border from EU funds. At the same time, he stressed that the Union is pursuing a “schizophrenic policy” on this issue. 

    “On the one hand, these are calls to protect the border, and on the other, to treat humanely those who break that border by force. It doesn’t add up,” said the Law and Justice politician.

     

    Saryusz-Wolski described the calls to invite Frontex as an attempt by the European Commission to interfere “at the instigation of the Germans” in matters that are not their own. At the same time, the EC argues against paying for the construction of a dam on the border.

    “So they don’t want to pay, but they do want to interfere. This proposal is to be ignored and rejected,” believes Jacek Saryusz-Wolski.

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